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Carmelita Iezzi 2019 © All Rights Reserved.

Interviews

MONOVIONS MAGAZINE

  • How and when did you become interested in photography?
    My artistic skills developed quite early, since childhood I has been fascinated with photography and painting. I was 14 years old when I bought my first analog camera 35 mm and I start to take pictures. Graduated at the Art School with specialization in Photography e Graphic Design. I was very fascinated by reportage and landscapes. I loved always to experiment creativity printed in the darkroom preferring high contrast papers, my favorite film was Kodak Tmax. Over the years I have attended courses with international photographers who have helped me to better understand my vision and focus on my creative potential. I have traveled frequently in the States and London, I have also lived some years in Greece whose culture and philosophy have inspired many of my works.
  • Is there any artist/photographer who inspired your art?
    When I began photographing I was fascinated by the artist Mario Giacomelli, I always loved his whites and deep blacks, emotions and poetry that transpired from his photographs, in those highly contrasted images I have always found the essence of my emotions . Other photographers that I always loved was Tina Modotti, one of the pioneer women of photography, his images full of humanity and contrasts have always fascinated me and Julia Margaret Cameron with her beautiful works and portraits photography. Today my inspiration is purely personal, comes from the small everyday things, from my family and emotions, my fears, my unconscious. Also from my cultural background, from love for painting, poetry, books and travel.Often what influences me are my dreams, every photographic project was born from a need to tell a part of me to others in the form of images, an emotion, a story, a feeling are the key of my inspirations.
  • Why do you work in black and white rather than colour?
    The black and white conveys most of our emotions, give more feelings and drama. I love telling stories, and with black and white I can convey more meaning to the viewer It must focus on the content and simplification.
  • How much preparation do you put into taking a photograph/series of photographs?
    My digital cameras are Leica and Nikon. I prefer natural light that allow me to capture my emotions , the nature and the human figure weaving dreamlike stories with them. I really like to use multiple exposures to create fantastic stories with real things. With the advent of digital I began the use of post processing that provide to emphasize the tones in black and white, making them much more contrasted and dramatic. In the same way as when I worked in the darkroom and I liked superimpose two negatives with the sandwich technique, now also working in some series in digital overlaying texture to create surreal situations that are able to affect the emotions.

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  • UNDEREXPOSED MAG
  • How does being a female photographer influence your work? Do you encounter any challenges in your practice related to that?

    Being a woman has definitely influenced my work. Making pictures of female subjects creates a feeling that I carry with me. My work is dreamy and my feminine instinct pushes me to believe in emotions and dreams rather than to think about technicality and rationality. Being carried away by emotions to conceive an idea and to transform it through the lens of my camera, is the essence of my photographic work. All this gives me opportunities for professional and artistic growth.

    Do you want to share something about your body of work? What are you working on right now?

    I love surreal and conceptual photography with a touch of mystery. I have many projects to pursue. At the moment I’m focused on my creative series about nature and flow of seasons, isolated subjects contemplating of the environment. This series of photographs is dreamy and emotional. It reflects the feeling of decay in nature during winter time, and it is permeated by a sense of sweet melancholy. In this creative work I prefer the use of texture to accentuate the dramatic elements of the winter and the emotions that emerge.

    5. How do you get inspiration? Who do you admire?

    I take inspiration from the little things of everyday life. I try to open my eyes and look at things in a different perspective then others, offering myself in everything I do. I let myself be carried away by dreams and emotions and when I have an idea in my head I try to turn it into a project. Usually it takes time to work on it, and I have to wait for the right moment, the right place and the right light. Sometimes it all happens randomly. But when I’m on the right way the project takes shape and my emotions begin to turn ideas into reality. I also love painting and I admire Renaissance art and Surrealism. Often I am also inspired by music and poetry.

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